New Delhi, Delhi, India  On World Thalassemia Day, Thalassemia Patients Advocacy Group (TPAG) proudly announces its collaboration with the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) for a groundbreaking initiative aimed at addressing the growing burden of thalassemia in India. This partnership marks a significant milestone in the ongoing efforts to combat thalassemia and ensure the well-being of individuals affected by this inherited blood disorder.

Thalassemia, a condition characterized by insufficient production of hemoglobin, poses a significant health challenge in India, with an estimated 100,000 patients and an alarming annual incidence of 10,000–15,000 children born with thalassemia major. Recognizing the urgent need for action, TPAG and CII have united under the Safe Blood Campaign to organize a series of voluntary blood donation camps tailored specifically for thalassemia patients.

Anubha Taneja-Mukherjee, Member Secretary of TPAG, expressed her enthusiasm for the collaboration, stating, “Under Safe Blood Campaign, CII and Thalassemia Patients Advocacy Group (TPAG) have come together to organize a series of voluntary blood donation camps for transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients in government hospitals in Delhi.” She emphasized the significance of these camps, timed to coincide with World Thalassemia Day (8th May) and World Blood Donor Day (14th June), in promoting safe blood practices and preventing transfusion-transmitted infections.

To further enhance the safety of donated blood, TPAG urges the government to prioritize the implementation of Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) screening nationwide. This advanced screening method can detect HIV 1 and 2, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C, ensuring that only safe blood is transfused to patients. TPAG advocates for the establishment of stringent blood laws to enforce these vital screening protocols across the country.

While acknowledging India’s potential for groundbreaking research in thalassemia treatment, TPAG emphasizes the need for regulatory evolution to align with international standards. Despite recent advancements, hemoglobinopathies continue to strain the healthcare system, highlighting the importance of ongoing research, improved accessibility to screening methods, and the exploration of curative options like gene therapy.

As the fight against thalassemia progresses, TPAG calls for collective action from healthcare professionals, policymakers, NGOs, and the public. Early detection through genetic testing, modernization of healthcare infrastructure, and increased access to blood banks are crucial steps towards reducing the burden of thalassemia and improving the quality of life for affected individuals.

TPAG remains committed to advocating for the prevention and treatment of thalassemia and invites stakeholders from all sectors to join in this vital mission.